27 Idioms for Birds: Feathered Phrases


Have you ever wondered how birds sneak into our conversations through idioms? In this article, we’ll unravel the meanings behind common bird-related idioms and learn how to use them in everyday sentences.

So, let’s dive into the avian world of expressions!

idioms for birds

What is an idiom for birds?

Idioms are phrases whose meanings can’t be understood from the individual words alone. They add color to our language, providing a glimpse into our cultural expressions.

Bird idioms, in particular, bring the beauty of nature into our daily speech. Now, let’s spread our wings and explore the meanings of these feathered phrases.


0%
0 votes, 0 avg
9
Created by Dr. Julia Rossi

English Language Level Placement Test – (TEFL)

Can you pass our Language Test?

Pass and receive an “English Language Level Placement” certificate.

1 / 20

What is a simile?

2 / 20

Identify the simile in the following sentence: “She swims like a fish.”

3 / 20

What is a metaphor?

4 / 20

Which of the following is a metaphor?

5 / 20

What is an idiom?

6 / 20

What does the idiom “break the ice” mean?

7 / 20

What is an adjective?

8 / 20

Choose the adjective in the following sentence: “The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.”

9 / 20

What is an abbreviation?

10 / 20

What does the abbreviation “e.g.” stand for?

11 / 20

What is a verb?

12 / 20

Identify the verb in the following sentence: “The cat sleeps on the sofa.”

13 / 20

“Out of the frying pan into the fire” is an example of:

14 / 20

Which of the following is an adjective?

15 / 20

The abbreviation “NASA” stands for:

16 / 20

Choose the metaphor in the following sentence: “Time is a thief.”

17 / 20

What does the idiom “hit the books” mean?

18 / 20

Which of the following sentences contains a simile?

19 / 20

“LOL” is an abbreviation for:

20 / 20

Identify the verb in this sentence: “They whispered secrets into the night.”

Enter your name and email to receive your certificate.

Your score is

The average score is 11%

0%


IdiomMeaningIn a Sentence
Nest EggSavings set aside for the future.She’s been diligently adding to her nest egg, preparing for unexpected expenses.
Wild Goose ChaseA futile pursuit or hopeless search.Searching for the lost keys in the dark alley turned out to be a wild goose chase.
Early Bird Catches the WormSuccess comes to those who act early.Waking up early every day, Mary proved that the early bird catches the worm by acing her exams.
Kill Two Birds with One StoneAccomplishing two tasks with a single effort.By finishing homework during lunch, she managed to kill two birds with one stone.
Birds of a Feather Flock TogetherSimilar people tend to associate with each other.It’s no surprise they became friends quickly; birds of a feather flock together.
Like a Duck to WaterQuickly and easily adapting to a new situation.Despite being nervous at first, she took to the new job like a duck to water.
Night OwlA person who stays up late at night.As a night owl, Jake often found his most productive hours after midnight.
A Little Bird Told MeLearning a secret from an unknown source.A little bird told me you’re planning a surprise party for my birthday.
Feather in One’s CapAn achievement to be proud of.Winning the championship was a feather in her cap after years of hard work.
Chicken OutBacking out of a challenging situation due to fear.He wanted to try bungee jumping but chickened out at the last moment.
A LarkA fun and carefree activity.Going on a spontaneous road trip was such a lark for the group of friends.
In the Pecking OrderThe hierarchy or ranking in a group.Even in the office, everyone knew their place in the pecking order.
Spread Your WingsEmbrace new opportunities or challenges.Graduating from high school, it was time for him to spread his wings and explore the world.
Hawk-EyedExtremely observant or watchful.The security guard was hawk-eyed, ensuring no one entered without proper authorization.
SwansongA final performance or act.Retirement felt like the swansong of her illustrious career.
Talk TurkeyTo discuss something frankly and directly.Let’s sit down and talk turkey about our plans for the future.
Watch Like a HawkTo monitor closely.The supervisor watched like a hawk to ensure the project stayed on schedule.
A Sitting DuckSomeone vulnerable or an easy target.Without proper cybersecurity, the company’s data was a sitting duck for hackers.
As the Crow FliesIn a straight line, the shortest distance between two points.Although the road was winding, as the crow flies, the destination was just a few miles away.
Eat Like a BirdConsuming a small amount of food.Despite her love for food, she always claimed to eat like a bird.
Penguin SuitFormal attire, typically a tuxedo.The invitation specified a penguin suit for the gala event.
Wise as an OwlExtremely wise or knowledgeable.Grandpa, with his years of experience, was as wise as an owl.
A Swallow Doesn’t Make a SummerA single positive event doesn’t guarantee future success.Winning one match doesn’t secure the championship; a swallow doesn’t make a summer.
Go SouthTo decline or deteriorate.The project started well, but things began to go south after unexpected challenges.
A Bird in the Hand is Worth Two in the BushIt’s better to have a small, certain advantage than to risk losing everything for something better.Despite tempting job offers, he decided to stay with his current stable position; after all, a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.
Fly Off the HandleLose one’s temper suddenly and unexpectedly.He tends to fly off the handle when things don’t go according to plan.
Put All Your Eggs in One BasketRelying entirely on one option or plan.It’s risky to put all your eggs in one basket; consider alternative strategies for success.

Metaphors can paint vivid pictures of birds, like comparing them to messengers of the sky, carrying secrets of the wind. To explore more metaphors for birds, you can visit this link: Metaphors for Birds. Similarly, similes offer comparisons that help us understand birds better, such as saying they are as graceful as a ballet dancer in flight. Discover additional similes for birds here: Similes for Birds.

Idioms for Birds

1. Nest Egg

Meaning: Savings set aside for the future.

In a Sentence: She’s been diligently adding to her nest egg, preparing for unexpected expenses.

2. Wild Goose Chase

Meaning: A futile pursuit or hopeless search.

In a Sentence: Searching for the lost keys in the dark alley turned out to be a wild goose chase.

3. Early Bird Catches the Worm

Meaning: Success comes to those who act early.

In a Sentence: Waking up early every day, Mary proved that the early bird catches the worm by acing her exams.

4. Kill Two Birds with One Stone

Meaning: Accomplishing two tasks with a single effort.

In a Sentence: By finishing homework during lunch, she managed to kill two birds with one stone.

5. Birds of a Feather Flock Together

Meaning: Similar people tend to associate with each other.

In a Sentence: It’s no surprise they became friends quickly; birds of a feather flock together.

6. Like a Duck to Water

Meaning: Quickly and easily adapting to a new situation.

In a Sentence: Despite being nervous at first, she took to the new job like a duck to water.

7. Night Owl

Meaning: A person who stays up late at night.

In a Sentence: As a night owl, Jake often found his most productive hours after midnight.

8. A Little Bird Told Me

Meaning: Learning a secret from an unknown source.

In a Sentence: A little bird told me you’re planning a surprise party for my birthday.

9. Feather in One’s Cap

Meaning: An achievement to be proud of.

In a Sentence: Winning the championship was a feather in her cap after years of hard work.

10. Chicken Out

Meaning: Backing out of a challenging situation due to fear.

In a Sentence: He wanted to try bungee jumping but chickened out at the last moment.

11. A Lark

Meaning: A fun and carefree activity.

In a Sentence: Going on a spontaneous road trip was such a lark for the group of friends.

12. In the Pecking Order

Meaning: The hierarchy or ranking in a group.

In a Sentence: Even in the office, everyone knew their place in the pecking order.

13. Spread Your Wings

Meaning: Embrace new opportunities or challenges.

In a Sentence: Graduating from high school, it was time for him to spread his wings and explore the world.

14. Hawk-Eyed

Meaning: Extremely observant or watchful.

In a Sentence: The security guard was hawk-eyed, ensuring no one entered without proper authorization.

15. Swansong

Meaning: A final performance or act.

In a Sentence: Retirement felt like the swansong of her illustrious career.

16. Talk Turkey

Meaning: To discuss something frankly and directly.

In a Sentence: Let’s sit down and talk turkey about our plans for the future.

17. Watch Like a Hawk

Meaning: To monitor closely.

In a Sentence: The supervisor watched like a hawk to ensure the project stayed on schedule.

18. A Sitting Duck

Meaning: Someone vulnerable or an easy target.

In a Sentence: Without proper cybersecurity, the company’s data was a sitting duck for hackers.

19. As the Crow Flies

Meaning: In a straight line, the shortest distance between two points.

In a Sentence: Although the road was winding, as the crow flies, the destination was just a few miles away.

20. Eat Like a Bird

Meaning: Consuming a small amount of food.

In a Sentence: Despite her love for food, she always claimed to eat like a bird.

21. Penguin Suit

Meaning: Formal attire, typically a tuxedo.

In a Sentence: The invitation specified a penguin suit for the gala event.

22. Wise as an Owl

Meaning: Extremely wise or knowledgeable.

In a Sentence: Grandpa, with his years of experience, was as wise as an owl.

23. A Swallow Doesn’t Make a Summer

Meaning: A single positive event doesn’t guarantee future success.

In a Sentence: Winning one match doesn’t secure the championship; a swallow doesn’t make a summer.

24. Go South

Meaning: To decline or deteriorate.

In a Sentence: The project started well, but things began to go south after unexpected challenges.

25. A Bird in the Hand is Worth Two in the Bush

Meaning: It’s better to have a small, certain advantage than to risk losing everything for something better.

In a Sentence: Despite tempting job offers, he decided to stay with his current stable position; after all, a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.

26. Fly Off the Handle

Meaning: Lose one’s temper suddenly and unexpectedly.

In a Sentence: He tends to fly off the handle when things don’t go according to plan.

27. Put All Your Eggs in One Basket

Meaning: Relying entirely on one option or plan.

In a Sentence: It’s risky to put all your eggs in one basket; consider alternative strategies for success.

10 Quizzes About The Idiom in The Article

Quiz 1: Nest Egg

  1. Question: What does the idiom “Nest Egg” mean?
  • A. A collection of bird nests
  • B. Savings set aside for the future
  • C. A wild goose chase
  • D. Early morning birdwatching
  1. Question: Can you use “Nest Egg” in a sentence?

Quiz 2: Wild Goose Chase

  1. Question: What is the meaning of “Wild Goose Chase”?
  • A. Successfully catching a wild goose
  • B. A hopeless and futile pursuit
  • C. Early morning bird hunting
  • D. A swift and unexpected flight of birds
  1. Question: Provide a sentence using “Wild Goose Chase.”

Quiz 3: Early Bird Catches the Worm

  1. Question: What does the phrase “Early Bird Catches the Worm” imply?
  • A. Birds eating worms early in the morning
  • B. Success comes to those who act early
  • C. Late-night birdwatching is rewarding
  • D. Only early risers enjoy bird songs
  1. Question: Create a sentence using “Early Bird Catches the Worm.”

Quiz 4: Kill Two Birds with One Stone

  1. Question: What does “Kill Two Birds with One Stone” mean?
  • A. A dangerous hunting practice
  • B. Accomplishing two tasks with a single effort
  • C. Birds of a feather flock together
  • D. Swift and efficient bird migration
  1. Question: Utilize “Kill Two Birds with One Stone” in a sentence.

Quiz 5: Birds of a Feather Flock Together

  1. Question: What is the significance of “Birds of a Feather Flock Together”?
  • A. Birds flying together during migration
  • B. Similar people tend to associate with each other
  • C. A little bird told me this saying
  • D. Different species of birds sharing a habitat
  1. Question: Create a sentence incorporating “Birds of a Feather Flock Together.”

Feel free to use these quizzes to test your knowledge of the bird idioms discussed in the article!

Conclusion

So there you have it, a bird’s-eye view of idioms that have found a perch in our everyday language. As you navigate the vast sky of expressions, remember the wisdom these idioms bring. Just like birds, our language is diverse, fascinating, and always evolving.

About the author

Latest posts

  • 25 Metaphors For Love

    25 Metaphors For Love

    Love, a complex and multifaceted emotion, has been a timeless subject of exploration and expression. One way humans have sought to understand and convey the nuances of love is through…

    Read more

  • 17 Metaphors For Life + Quiz

    17 Metaphors For Life + Quiz

    Navigating the complexities of life often requires a metaphorical lens through which we can view our experiences. Metaphors for life provide a rich tapestry of imagery that encapsulates the essence…

    Read more