27 Idioms for Children: Fun and Easy Phrases to Learn


They are phrases that don’t mean what they say, and they add a little flavor to our everyday conversations.

In this article, we’re going to explore 27 idioms that are perfect for children. We’ll break down what each one means and show you how to use them in a sentence.

So, if you’re ready to unlock the world of idioms, let’s dive in!

idioms for children

What is an idiom for children?

Before we jump into the list of idioms, let’s make sure we understand what an idiom is.


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Created by Dr. Julia Rossi

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1 / 20

What is a simile?

2 / 20

Identify the simile in the following sentence: “She swims like a fish.”

3 / 20

What is a metaphor?

4 / 20

Which of the following is a metaphor?

5 / 20

What is an idiom?

6 / 20

What does the idiom “break the ice” mean?

7 / 20

What is an adjective?

8 / 20

Choose the adjective in the following sentence: “The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.”

9 / 20

What is an abbreviation?

10 / 20

What does the abbreviation “e.g.” stand for?

11 / 20

What is a verb?

12 / 20

Identify the verb in the following sentence: “The cat sleeps on the sofa.”

13 / 20

“Out of the frying pan into the fire” is an example of:

14 / 20

Which of the following is an adjective?

15 / 20

The abbreviation “NASA” stands for:

16 / 20

Choose the metaphor in the following sentence: “Time is a thief.”

17 / 20

What does the idiom “hit the books” mean?

18 / 20

Which of the following sentences contains a simile?

19 / 20

“LOL” is an abbreviation for:

20 / 20

Identify the verb in this sentence: “They whispered secrets into the night.”

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An idiom is a group of words whose meaning isn’t clear from the individual words themselves.

Instead, their meaning is something different and often unique. Idioms are like little secrets in the English language!

Now, let’s take a look at some idioms and their meanings:

IdiomMeaningExample Sentence
Piece of cakeSomething very easy to do.“Taking care of my little sister is a piece of cake for me.”
Break a legA way to wish someone good luck.“Before the big soccer game, his coach told him, ‘Break a leg!’”
Kick the bucketTo pass away or die.“My old toy finally kicked the bucket, so I got a new one.”
Bite the bulletTo face a difficult situation with courage.“Even though she was scared, she decided to bite the bullet and give her speech.”
Cat got your tongue?Asking someone why they’re not speaking.“You’ve been quiet all day; cat got your tongue?”
Hit the hayTo go to bed or sleep.“It’s getting late; I think it’s time to hit the hay.”
Raining cats and dogsA very heavy rainstorm.“We can’t go to the park today; it’s raining cats and dogs.”
Don’t cry over spilled milkDon’t get upset about things that have already happened.“I accidentally dropped my ice cream, but there’s no use crying over spilled milk.”
Under the weatherFeeling slightly sick or not well.“I won’t be at school today; I’m feeling a bit under the weather.”
Jump on the bandwagonTo join a popular trend or activity.“Everyone is playing that new game; I want to jump on the bandwagon too.”
Out of the blueSomething that happens unexpectedly.“He called me out of the blue to invite me to his birthday party.”
Barking up the wrong treeTo be pursuing the wrong course of action or looking in the wrong place.“If you think I took your candy, you’re barking up the wrong tree.”
Don’t count your chickens before they hatchDon’t make plans based on something that might not happen.“I know you’re excited about the game, but don’t count your chickens before they hatch.”
Actions speak louder than wordsWhat you do is more important than what you say.“Instead of promising to help, show that you care—actions speak louder than words.”
Don’t put all your eggs in one basketDon’t risk everything on a single plan or idea.“I’m saving money for college, but I’m also investing in stocks because I don’t want to put all my eggs in one basket.”
The ball is in your courtIt’s your turn to make a decision or take action.“I’ve given you all the information you need; now the ball is in your court.”
Two heads are better than oneIt’s better to have help or input from someone else when making decisions.“Let’s work on this project together; two heads are better than one.”
When pigs flySomething that is highly unlikely to ever happen.“I’ll clean my room when pigs fly.”
A penny for your thoughtsAsking someone to share their thoughts or what they are thinking.“You look lost in thought; a penny for your thoughts?”
A piece of the pieA share in something, especially a profit or success.“After all the hard work, I finally got my piece of the pie.”
Let the cat out of the bagTo reveal a secret.“I accidentally let the cat out of the bag about the surprise party.”
Hitting the nail on the headTo describe something accurately or make a good point.“Her explanation about the science project really hit the nail on the head.”
Curiosity killed the catBeing too curious or nosy can get you into trouble.“Don’t snoop around in your sister’s room; remember, curiosity killed the cat.”
All earsGiving someone your full attention and listening carefully.“I’m all ears; tell me what happened at school today.”
The early bird catches the wormBeing early or starting something early can lead to success.“I woke up early to study for the test because the early bird catches the worm.”
Back to the drawing boardGoing back to the beginning because a plan or idea didn’t work.“Our project failed, so it’s back to the drawing board for us.”
It’s a piece of the puzzleA small part of a larger problem or situation.“Understanding math can be challenging, but each lesson is a piece of the puzzle.”

Children are like seeds, full of potential and ready to bloom into beautiful flowers with the right care and nurturing. If you want more comparisons to describe children, you can check this link: Similes for children. And for a variety of metaphors related to children, you can explore this link: Metaphors for children.

Idioms for Children

1. Piece of cake

Meaning: Something that is very easy to do.

In a Sentence: “Taking care of my little sister is a piece of cake for me.”

2. Break a leg

Meaning: A way to wish someone good luck.

In a Sentence: “Before the big soccer game, his coach told him, ‘Break a leg!’”

3. Kick the bucket

Meaning: To pass away or die.

In a Sentence: “My old toy finally kicked the bucket, so I got a new one.”

4. Bite the bullet

Meaning: To face a difficult situation with courage.

In a Sentence: “Even though she was scared, she decided to bite the bullet and give her speech.”

5. Cat got your tongue?

Meaning: Asking someone why they’re not speaking.

In a Sentence: “You’ve been quiet all day; cat got your tongue?”

6. Hit the hay

Meaning: To go to bed or sleep.

In a Sentence: “It’s getting late; I think it’s time to hit the hay.”

7. Raining cats and dogs

Meaning: A very heavy rainstorm.

In a Sentence: “We can’t go to the park today; it’s raining cats and dogs.”

8. Don’t cry over spilled milk

Meaning: Don’t get upset about things that have already happened and can’t be changed.

In a Sentence: “I accidentally dropped my ice cream, but there’s no use crying over spilled milk.”

9. Under the weather

Meaning: Feeling slightly sick or not well.

In a Sentence: “I won’t be at school today; I’m feeling a bit under the weather.”

10. Jump on the bandwagon

Meaning: To join a popular trend or activity.

In a Sentence: “Everyone is playing that new game; I want to jump on the bandwagon too.”

11. Out of the blue

Meaning: Something that happens unexpectedly.

In a Sentence: “He called me out of the blue to invite me to his birthday party.”

12. Barking up the wrong tree

Meaning: To be pursuing the wrong course of action or looking in the wrong place.

In a Sentence: “If you think I took your candy, you’re barking up the wrong tree.”

13. Don’t count your chickens before they hatch

Meaning: Don’t make plans based on something that might not happen.

In a Sentence: “I know you’re excited about the game, but don’t count your chickens before they hatch.”

14. Actions speak louder than words

Meaning: What you do is more important than what you say.

In a Sentence: “Instead of promising to help, show that you care—actions speak louder than words.”

15. Don’t put all your eggs in one basket

Meaning: Don’t risk everything on a single plan or idea.

In a Sentence: “I’m saving money for college, but I’m also investing in stocks because I don’t want to put all my eggs in one basket.”

16. The ball is in your court

Meaning: It’s your turn to make a decision or take action.

In a Sentence: “I’ve given you all the information you need; now the ball is in your court.”

17. Two heads are better than one

Meaning: It’s better to have help or input from someone else when making decisions.

In a Sentence: “Let’s work on this project together; two heads are better than one.”

18. When pigs fly

Meaning: Something that is highly unlikely to ever happen.

In a Sentence: “I’ll clean my room when pigs fly.”

19. A penny for your thoughts

Meaning: Asking someone to share their thoughts or what they are thinking.

In a Sentence: “You look lost in thought; a penny for your thoughts?”

20. A piece of the pie

Meaning: A share in something, especially a profit or success.

In a Sentence: “After all the hard work, I finally got my piece of the pie.”

21. Let the cat out of the bag

Meaning: To reveal a secret.

In a Sentence: “I accidentally let the cat out of the bag about the surprise party.”

22. Hitting the nail on the head

Meaning: To describe something accurately or make a good point.

In a Sentence: “Her explanation about the science project really hit the nail on the head.”

23. Curiosity killed the cat

Meaning: Being too curious or nosy can get you into trouble.

In a Sentence: “Don’t snoop around in your sister’s room; remember, curiosity killed the cat.”

24. All ears

Meaning: Giving someone your full attention and listening carefully.

In a Sentence: “I’m all ears; tell me what happened at school today.”

25. The early bird catches the worm

Meaning: Being early or starting something early can lead to success.

In a Sentence: “I woke up early to study for the test because the early bird catches the worm.”

26. Back to the drawing board

Meaning: Going back to the beginning because a plan or idea didn’t work.

In a Sentence: “Our project failed, so it’s back to the drawing board for us.”

27. It’s a piece of the puzzle

Meaning: A small part of a larger problem or situation.

In a Sentence: “Understanding math can be challenging, but each lesson is a piece of the puzzle.”

Quizzes About The Idioms in The Article

Quiz 1: Piece of Cake

  1. What does the idiom “piece of cake” mean?
  • a) Something very challenging
  • b) Something very easy
  • c) Something delicious to eat
  • d) Something you don’t want to share

Quiz 2: Break a Leg

  1. What is the common meaning of the expression “break a leg”?
  • a) Get some exercise
  • b) Good luck
  • c) Don’t fall down
  • d) Dance gracefully

Quiz 3: Bite the Bullet

  1. When someone says, “I had to bite the bullet,” what are they saying?
  • a) They bit an actual bullet
  • b) They faced a difficult situation with courage
  • c) They got a new toothbrush
  • d) They didn’t know what to do

Quiz 4: Cat Got Your Tongue?

  1. What is the meaning of the phrase “cat got your tongue?”
  • a) Asking if someone has a cat
  • b) Asking why someone is quiet
  • c) Asking about someone’s pet
  • d) Asking if someone is hungry

Quiz 5: Raining Cats and Dogs

  1. If someone says, “It’s raining cats and dogs,” what are they describing?
  • a) A clear and sunny day
  • b) A light rain shower
  • c) A heavy rainstorm
  • d) A weather forecast

Quiz 6: Don’t Cry Over Spilled Milk

  1. What does the idiom “Don’t cry over spilled milk” mean?
  • a) It’s okay to cry when something spills
  • b) Don’t worry about accidents
  • c) Cry when you’re sad
  • d) Cry when you’re happy

Quiz 7: Jump on the Bandwagon

  1. What does it mean to “jump on the bandwagon”?
  • a) Jump on a moving vehicle
  • b) Join a popular trend or activity
  • c) Avoid the crowd
  • d) Stay away from fun activities

Quiz 8: Back to the Drawing Board

  1. What does the expression “back to the drawing board” mean?
  • a) Going back to the art studio
  • b) Restarting a plan because it didn’t work
  • c) Taking a break from drawing
  • d) Drawing on a whiteboard

Quiz 9: Hitting the Nail on the Head

  1. What does it mean to “hit the nail on the head”?
  • a) Hitting a nail with a hammer
  • b) Describing something accurately or making a good point
  • c) Missing the target
  • d) Avoiding a problem

Quiz 10: Two Heads Are Better Than One

  1. What is the message behind “two heads are better than one”?
    • a) It’s better to have no help
    • b) It’s better to have two heads
    • c) It’s better to work together and get input from others
    • d) It’s better to work alone

Conclusion

Idioms can be like a secret code in the English language, but once you know their meanings, they can be a lot of fun to use. So, the next time someone tells you to “break a leg,” you’ll know they’re just wishing you good luck!

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