27 Idioms for Learning + Quiz


Learning is an exciting journey, and language often reflects our quest for knowledge and understanding.

Idioms for learning are like signposts on this educational road, offering valuable insights and wisdom. In this listicle, we’ll explore these idioms, decipher their meanings, and uncover the lessons they teach.

idioms for learning

What is an idiom for learning?

Idioms for learning are expressions that use words and phrases related to the process of gaining knowledge and experience.

These idioms often offer advice, share experiences, or provide witty observations about learning. Let’s dive into this educational adventure.


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Created by Dr. Julia Rossi

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1 / 20

What is a simile?

2 / 20

Identify the simile in the following sentence: “She swims like a fish.”

3 / 20

What is a metaphor?

4 / 20

Which of the following is a metaphor?

5 / 20

What is an idiom?

6 / 20

What does the idiom “break the ice” mean?

7 / 20

What is an adjective?

8 / 20

Choose the adjective in the following sentence: “The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.”

9 / 20

What is an abbreviation?

10 / 20

What does the abbreviation “e.g.” stand for?

11 / 20

What is a verb?

12 / 20

Identify the verb in the following sentence: “The cat sleeps on the sofa.”

13 / 20

“Out of the frying pan into the fire” is an example of:

14 / 20

Which of the following is an adjective?

15 / 20

The abbreviation “NASA” stands for:

16 / 20

Choose the metaphor in the following sentence: “Time is a thief.”

17 / 20

What does the idiom “hit the books” mean?

18 / 20

Which of the following sentences contains a simile?

19 / 20

“LOL” is an abbreviation for:

20 / 20

Identify the verb in this sentence: “They whispered secrets into the night.”

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IdiomMeaningIn a Sentence
Hit the BooksTo study diligently or engage in focused reading.Before the exam, she needed to hit the books to prepare.
Burn the Midnight OilTo work or study late into the night or early morning hours.He had to burn the midnight oil to finish his research paper.
Learn the RopesTo acquire the necessary skills or knowledge to do something.It takes time to learn the ropes of a new job.
The Ball Is in Your CourtThe next move or decision is up to you.Now that you have all the information, the ball is in your court.
Pick Someone’s BrainTo seek someone’s advice or expertise on a particular topic.I wanted to pick her brain about the best way to start a business.
Read Between the LinesTo understand a deeper or hidden meaning in what someone is saying or writing.When she said, “I’m fine,” I had to read between the lines and know something was bothering her.
A Picture Is Worth a Thousand WordsVisual information can convey more than words alone.Instead of explaining, he showed me a photo, proving that a picture is worth a thousand words.
Practice Makes PerfectRepeatedly doing something improves your skill or ability.She knew that practicing the piano every day was essential because practice makes perfect.
Get the Hang of ItTo become skilled or proficient at something through practice.After a few tries, I finally got the hang of riding a bike.
Jump in with Both FeetTo start a new project or venture with enthusiasm and full commitment.He decided to jump in with both feet and start his own business.
Cut to the ChaseTo get straight to the main point without unnecessary details.Instead of rambling, let’s cut to the chase and discuss the key issues.
In the Same BoatFacing the same difficulties or challenges as others.We’re all in the same boat when it comes to adapting to the new software.
Break the IceTo start a conversation or interaction in a friendly and relaxed way.She tried to break the ice by complimenting his artwork.
Learn the Hard WayTo learn from experience or by making mistakes.Unfortunately, he had to learn the hard way that procrastination leads to missed opportunities.
Get a Taste of Your Own MedicineTo experience the same negative treatment or consequences that you have imposed on others.After years of making fun of his classmates, he got a taste of his own medicine when they teased him.
It’s Greek to MeTo not understand something at all, especially when it seems confusing or unfamiliar.The advanced calculus textbook is like a foreign language; it’s all Greek to me.
Beat Around the BushTo avoid addressing a topic directly, often due to discomfort or hesitation.Instead of answering the question, he kept beating around the bush.
Teach an Old Dog New TricksTo show that it’s possible to teach someone, even someone with experience, something new.Despite his age, he learned how to use modern technology; you can teach an old dog new tricks.
A Penny for Your ThoughtsTo ask someone what they are thinking or to inquire about their opinion.You seem lost in thought; a penny for your thoughts?
Don’t Judge a Book by Its CoverTo not judge someone or something based on their appearance alone.She may seem shy, but don’t judge a book by its cover; she’s incredibly talented.
Like Riding a BicycleTo describe a skill that, once learned, is not easily forgotten.Playing the piano is like riding a bicycle; I can still do it after years of not practicing.
Make a Long Story ShortTo summarize a lengthy or detailed story or explanation.Let me make a long story short; we missed the train and had to take a cab.
The Proof Is in the PuddingThe true value or quality of something can only be determined when it’s tested or put to use.You can read all the books, but the proof is in the pudding when you start applying the knowledge.
Learn by HeartTo memorize something thoroughly, such as facts or lines from a play.She learned the poem by heart and recited it flawlessly.
Back to Square OneTo return to the starting point or to start over because previous efforts were unsuccessful.After the project failed, they had to go back to square one and rethink their strategy.
Keep Your Nose to the GrindstoneTo work hard and diligently, often in a focused and unrelenting manner.To achieve success, it’s essential to keep your nose to the grindstone and stay committed.
Barking Up the Wrong TreeTo pursue a course of action or idea that is unlikely to succeed or is based on a false premise.If you think he’s the one who stole your phone, you might be barking up the wrong tree.

Metaphors can depict learning in various ways, like comparing it to a key that unlocks the doors to new knowledge and understanding. To explore more metaphors for learning, you can visit this link: Metaphors for Learning. Similarly, similes offer comparisons that make learning more relatable, such as saying it’s as enlightening as a beam of sunlight piercing through the clouds. Discover additional similes for learning here: Similes for Learning.

Idioms for Learning

1. Hit the Books

Meaning: To study diligently or engage in focused reading.

In a Sentence: Before the exam, she needed to hit the books to prepare.

2. Burn the Midnight Oil

Meaning: To work or study late into the night or early morning hours.

In a Sentence: He had to burn the midnight oil to finish his research paper.

3. Learn the Ropes

Meaning: To acquire the necessary skills or knowledge to do something.

In a Sentence: It takes time to learn the ropes of a new job.

4. The Ball Is in Your Court

Meaning: The next move or decision is up to you.

In a Sentence: Now that you have all the information, the ball is in your court.

5. Pick Someone’s Brain

Meaning: To seek someone’s advice or expertise on a particular topic.

In a Sentence: I wanted to pick her brain about the best way to start a business.

6. Read Between the Lines

Meaning: To understand a deeper or hidden meaning in what someone is saying or writing.

In a Sentence: When she said, “I’m fine,” I had to read between the lines and know something was bothering her.

7. A Picture Is Worth a Thousand Words

Meaning: Visual information can convey more than words alone.

In a Sentence: Instead of explaining, he showed me a photo, proving that a picture is worth a thousand words.

8. Practice Makes Perfect

Meaning: Repeatedly doing something improves your skill or ability.

In a Sentence: She knew that practicing the piano every day was essential because practice makes perfect.

9. Get the Hang of It

Meaning: To become skilled or proficient at something through practice.

In a Sentence: After a few tries, I finally got the hang of riding a bike.

10. Jump in with Both Feet

Meaning: To start a new project or venture with enthusiasm and full commitment.

In a Sentence: He decided to jump in with both feet and start his own business.

11. Cut to the Chase

Meaning: To get straight to the main point without unnecessary details.

In a Sentence: Instead of rambling, let’s cut to the chase and discuss the key issues.

12. In the Same Boat

Meaning: Facing the same difficulties or challenges as others.

In a Sentence: We’re all in the same boat when it comes to adapting to the new software.

13. Break the Ice

Meaning: To start a conversation or interaction in a friendly and relaxed way.

In a Sentence: She tried to break the ice by complimenting his artwork.

14. Learn the Hard Way

Meaning: To learn from experience or by making mistakes.

In a Sentence: Unfortunately, he had to learn the hard way that procrastination leads to missed opportunities.

15. Get a Taste of Your Own Medicine

Meaning: To experience the same negative treatment or consequences that you have imposed on others.

In a Sentence: After years of making fun of his classmates, he got a taste of his own medicine when they teased him.

16. It’s Greek to Me

Meaning: To not understand something at all, especially when it seems confusing or unfamiliar.

In a Sentence: The advanced calculus textbook is like a foreign language; it’s all Greek to me.

17. Beat Around the Bush

Meaning: To avoid addressing a topic directly, often due to discomfort or hesitation.

In a Sentence: Instead of answering the question, he kept beating around the bush.

18. Teach an Old Dog New Tricks

Meaning: To show that it’s possible to teach someone, even someone with experience, something new.

In a Sentence: Despite his age, he learned how to use modern technology; you can teach an old dog new tricks.

19. A Penny for Your Thoughts

Meaning: To ask someone what they are thinking or to inquire about their opinion.

In a Sentence: You seem lost in thought; a penny for your thoughts?

20. Don’t Judge a Book by Its Cover

Meaning: To not judge someone or something based on their appearance alone.

In a Sentence: She may seem shy, but don’t judge a book by its cover; she’s incredibly talented.

21. Like Riding a Bicycle

Meaning: To describe a skill that, once learned, is not easily forgotten.

In a Sentence: Playing the piano is like riding a bicycle; I can still do it after years of not practicing.

22. Make a Long Story Short

Meaning: To summarize a lengthy or detailed story or explanation.

In a Sentence: Let me make a long story short; we missed the train and had to take a cab.

23. The Proof Is in the Pudding

Meaning: The true value or quality of something can only be determined when it’s tested or put to use.

In a Sentence: You can read all the books, but the proof is in the pudding when you start applying the knowledge.

24. Learn by Heart

Meaning: To memorize something thoroughly, such as facts or lines from a play.

In a Sentence: She learned the poem by heart and recited it flawlessly.

25. Back to Square One

Meaning: To return to the starting point or to start over because previous efforts were unsuccessful.

In a Sentence: After the project failed, they had to go back to square one and rethink their strategy.

26. Keep Your Nose to the Grindstone

Meaning: To work hard and diligently, often in a focused and unrelenting manner.

In a Sentence: To achieve success, it’s essential to keep your nose to the grindstone and stay committed.

27. Barking Up the Wrong Tree

Meaning: To pursue a course of action or idea that is unlikely to succeed or is based on a false premise.

In a Sentence: If you think he’s the one who stole your phone, you might be barking up the wrong tree.

Quizzes About The Idioms in The Article

Quiz 1: Hit the Books and Learn

  1. What does the idiom “Hit the Books” mean?
    • A. To read books for leisure
    • B. To study diligently or engage in focused reading
    • C. To donate books to a library
  2. When might you need to “Hit the Books”?

Quiz 2: Midnight Oil and Hard Work

  1. What does it mean to “Burn the Midnight Oil”?
    • A. To stay up all night partying
    • B. To work or study late into the night or early morning hours
    • C. To watch movies late at night
  2. Share a situation where you might have to “Burn the Midnight Oil.”

Quiz 3: Learning the Ropes

  1. What does the idiom “Learn the Ropes” imply?
    • A. Learning how to climb mountains
    • B. Acquiring the necessary skills or knowledge to do something
    • C. Practicing rope tricks
  2. When have you had to “Learn the Ropes” in your life?

Quiz 4: The Ball’s in Your Court

  1. What does it mean when someone says, “The Ball Is in Your Court”?
    • A. You should play a sport
    • B. The next move or decision is up to you
    • C. You are responsible for the game’s ball
  2. Provide an example of a situation where “The Ball Is in Your Court.”

Quiz 5: Brainy Discussions

  1. What does “Pick Someone’s Brain” mean?
    • A. To ask someone for their favorite book
    • B. To seek someone’s advice or expertise on a particular topic
    • C. To challenge someone’s intelligence
  2. Why might you want to “Pick Someone’s Brain”?

Quiz 6: Hidden Meanings

  1. What does it mean to “Read Between the Lines”?
    • A. To literally read the lines in a book
    • B. To understand a deeper or hidden meaning in what someone is saying or writing
    • C. To skip lines while reading
  2. Describe a situation where you had to “Read Between the Lines.”

Quiz 7: A Picture’s Value

  1. What is the message behind the saying “A Picture Is Worth a Thousand Words”?
    • A. Images are better than words
    • B. Visual information can convey more than words alone
    • C. A picture is worth exactly one thousand words
  2. How do you interpret the idea that “A Picture Is Worth a Thousand Words”?

Quiz 8: The Path to Mastery

  1. What does the expression “Practice Makes Perfect” suggest?
    • A. Repeated practice doesn’t improve skills
    • B. Repeatedly doing something improves your skill or ability
    • C. Perfect practice is essential for skill development
  2. Share a personal experience where you witnessed how “Practice Makes Perfect.”

Quiz 9: Getting the Hang of It

  1. When might someone say, “Get the Hang of It”?
    • A. When trying a new sport for the first time
    • B. When becoming skilled or proficient at something through practice
    • C. When feeling dizzy while hanging upside down
  2. Can you recall a time when you had to “Get the Hang of” a new skill or activity?

Quiz 10: Enthusiasm and Commitment

  1. What does it mean to “Jump in with Both Feet”?
    • A. To hop around with excitement
    • B. To start a new project or venture with enthusiasm and full commitment
    • C. To swim using only one foot
  2. Provide an example of a situation where you would decide to “Jump in with Both Feet.”

Conclusion

Idioms for learning are like treasures of wisdom that guide us on our educational journeys. They offer valuable insights into the process of gaining knowledge, from hitting the books to learning from our mistakes. These idioms remind us that learning is a lifelong adventure filled with challenges and opportunities.

Cite this entry:

Phrasesdirectory.com. “,” Retrieved from Phrases Directory – Accessed

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